The User Illusion: Cutting consciousness down to size

In this entertaining and ambitious book Tor Nørretranders argues that consciousness, that hallmark of higher intelligence, is nothing more than an illusion, a picture of reality created by our brain that we mistake by the real thing. The book received good reviews and was very well received in his native country, Denmark, and all over the world.

Using fairly objective data, Nørretranders makes his main point that consciousness has a very limited bandwidth, probably no more than 20 bits a second. This means that we cannot, consciously, process more than a few bits a second, distilled from the megabytes of information processed by our senses in the same period. Furthermore, this stream of information creates a simulation of reality, which we mistake for the real thing, and the illusion that our conscious self (the “I”) in in charge, while the unconscious self (the “me”) follows the orders given by the “I”.

the_users_illusion

There is significant evidence that Nørretranders’ main point is well taken. We know (and he points it out in his book) that consciousness lags behind our actions, even conscious ones, by about half a second. As is also pointed out by another author, Daniel Dennett, in his book Consciousness Explained, consciousness controls much less than we think. Consciousness is more of a module that observes what is going on and explains it in terms of “conscious decisions” and “conscious attention”. This means that consciousness is more of an observer of our actions, than the agent that determines them. Our feeling that we consciously control our desires, actions, and sentiments is probably far from the truth, and a lot of what we consciously observe is a simulation carefully crafted by our “consciousness” module. Nørretranders refers to the fact that some people believe that consciousness is a recent phenomenon, maybe no more than a few thousand years old, as Julian Jaynes defended in his famous book, The Bicameral Mind.

Nørretranders uses these arguments to argue that we should pay less attention to conscious decisions (the “I”, as he describes it) and more to unconscious urges (the “me”, in his book), letting the unconscious “me”, who has access to vastly larger amounts of information, in control of more of your decisions.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s