Uber temporarily halts self-driving cars on the wake of fatal accident

Uber decided to halt all self-driving cars operations following a fatal accident involving an Uber car driving in autonomous mode, in Tempe, Arizona. Although the details are sketchy, Elaine Herzberg, a 49-year-old woman was crossing the street, outside the crosswalk,  in her bike, when she was fatally struck by a Volvo XC90 outfitted with the company’s sensing systems, in autonomous mode. She was taken to the hospital, where she later died as a consequence of the injuries. A human safety driver was behind the wheel but did not intervene.  The weather was clear and no special driving conditions have been reported but reports say she crossed the road suddenly, coming from a poorly lit area.

The accident raised concerns about the safety of autonomous vehicles, and the danger they may cause to people. Uber has decided to halt all self-driving car operations, pending investigation of the accident.

Video released by the Tempe police shows the poor light conditions and the sudden appearance of the woman with the bike. From the video, the collision looks unavoidable, by looking only at camera images. Other sensors, on the other hand, might have helped.

In 2016, about 1 person has died in traffic accidents, per each 100 million miles travelled by cars. Uber has, reportedly, logged 3 million miles in its autonomous vehicles. Since no technology will reduce the number of accidents to zero, further studies will be required to assess the comparative safety of autonomous vs. non-autonomous vehicles.

Photo credits: ABC-15 via Associated Press.

Nectome, a Y-combinator startup, wants to upload your mind

Y-combinator is a well known startup accelerator, which accepts and supports startups developing new ideas. Well-known companies, like Airbnb, Dropbox and Unbabel were incubated there, as were many others which became successful.

Wild as the ideas pitched at Y-combinator may be, however, so far no proposal was as ambitious as the one pitched by Nectome, a startup that wants to backup your mind. More precisely, Nectome wants to process and chemically preserve your brain, down to its most detailed structures, in order to make it possible to upload your mind sometime in the future. Robert McIntyre, founder and CEO of Nectome, and an MIT graduate, will pitch his company in a meeting in New York, next week.

Nectome’s is committed to the goal of archiving your mind, as goes the description in the website, by building the next generation of tools to preserve the connectome, the pattern of neuron interconnections that constitutes a brain. Nectome’s technology uses a process known as vitrifixation (also known as Aldehyde-Stabilized Cryopreservation) to stabilize and preserve a brain, down to its finer structures.

The idea is to keep the physical structure of the brain intact for the future (even though that will involve destroying the actual brain) in the hope that you may one day reverse engineer and reproduce, in the memory of a computer, the working processes of that brain. This idea, that you may be able to simulate a particular brain in a computer, a process known as mind uploading is, of course, not novel. It was popularized by many authors, most famously by Ray Kurzweil,  in his books. It has also been addressed in many non-fiction books, such as Superintelligence and The Digital Mind, both featured in this blog.

Photo by Nectome