A conversation with GPT-3 on COVID-19

GPT-3 is the most advanced language model ever created, a product of an effort by OpenAI to create a publicly available system that can be used to advance research and applications in natural language. The model itself published less than three months ago, is an autoregressive language model with 175 billion parameters and was trained with a dataset that includes almost a trillion words.

Impressive as that may be, it is difficult to get some intuition of what such a complex model, trained on billions of human-generated texts, can actually do. Can it be used effectively in translation tasks or in answering questions?

To get some idea of what a sufficiently high-level statistical model of human language can do, I challenge you to have a look at this conversation with GPT-3, published by Kirk Ouimet a few days ago. It relates a dialogue between him and GPT-3 on the topic of COVID-19. The most impressive thing about this conversation with an AI is not that it gets many of the responses right (others not so much). What impressed me is that the model was trained with a dataset created before the existence of COVID-19, which provided GPT-3 no specific knowledge about this pandemic. Whatever answers GPT-3 gives to the questions related to COVID-19 are obtained with knowledge that was already available before the pandemic began.

This certainly raises some questions on whether advanced AI systems should be more widely used to define and implement policies important to the human race.

If you want more information bout GPT-3, it is easy to find in a multitude of sites with tutorials and demonstrations, such as TheNextWeb, MIT Technology Review, and many, many others.

Instantiation, another great collection of Greg Egan’s short stories

Greg Egan is a master of short-story telling. His Axiomatic collection of short stories is one of my favorites. This new collection of short stories keeps Egan’s knack for communicating deep concepts using few words and dives deeper into the concepts of virtual reality and the impacts of technology in society.

The first story, The discrete charm of the Turing machine, could hardly be more relevant these days, when the discussions on the economic impacts of Artificial Intelligence are taking place everywhere. But the main conducting line of the book is the series of stories where sentient humans who are, in fact, characters in virtual reality games, plot to break free of their slave condition. To find out whether they succeed or not, you will have to read to book yourself!

PS: As a joke, I leave here a meme of unknown origin

SIMULACRON-3: are we living in a computer simulation?

Are we living in a computer simulation? And, if so, how could we tell? This question became very popular in the last few years and has led to many articles, comments, and arguments. The simulation hypothesis which states that all of reality, including the Earth and the observable universe, could, in fact, be the result of a computer simulation is a hot topic of debate among philosophers, scientists, and SF writers.  Even the popular Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal (SMBC) webcomic has helped clarify the issue, in a very popular strip. Greg Egan, the master of realistic SF, may have taken the matter to its ultimate consequences, with Permutation City and Instantiation, but the truth is that this question has been the subject of many books, including the famous Neuromancer, by William Gibson.

Still, to my knowledge, Simulacron-3, by Daniel Galouye, may have been the first SF book to tackle the issue head-on. For a book written more than half a century ago, the story is surprisingly modern and up-to-date. Not only the presentation of the simulated reality world is very convincing and the technology very believable, but it also turns out that the reasons why the simulated reality world (Simulacron-3) was created could be sold as a business plan for any ambitious startup today.

There is not much more that I can write about this book without depriving you of the pleasure of reading it, so let me just recommend that you get a copy from a website near you and take with you for the summer holidays.