The Book of Why

Correlation is not causation is a mantra that you may have heard many times, calling attention to the fact that no matter how strong the relations one may find between variables, they are not conclusive evidence for the existence of a cause and effect relationship. In fact, most modern AI and Machine Learning techniques look for relations between variables to infer useful classifiers, regressors, and decision mechanisms. Statistical studies, with either big or small data, have also generally abstained from explicitly inferring causality between phenomena, except when randomized control trials are used, virtually the unique case where causality can be inferred with little or no risk of confounding.

In The Book of Why, Judea Pearl, in collaboration with Dana Mackenzie, ups the ante and argues not only that one should not stay away from reasoning about causes and effects, but also that the decades-old practice of avoiding causal reasoning has been one of the reasons for our limited success in many fields, including Artificial Intelligence.

Pearl’s main point is that causal reasoning is not only essential for higher-level intelligence but is also the natural way we, humans, think about the world. Pearl, a world-renowned researcher for his work in probabilistic reasoning, has made many contributions to AI and statistics, including the well known Bayesian networks, an approach that exposes regularities in joint probability distributions. Still, he thinks that all those contributions pale in comparison with the revolution he speared on the effective use of causal reasoning in statistics.

Pearl argues that statistical-based AI systems are restricted to finding associations between variables, stuck in what he calls rung 1 of the Ladder of Causation: Association. Seeing associations leads to a very superficial understanding of the world since it restricts the actor to the observation of variables and the analysis of relations between them. In rung 2 of the Ladder, Intervention, actors can intervene and change the world, which leads to an understanding of cause and effect. In rung 3, Counterfactuals, actors can imagine different worlds, namely what would have happened if the actor did this instead of that.

This may seem a bit abstract, but that is where the book becomes a very pleasant surprise. Although it is a book written for the general public, the authors go deeply into the questions, getting to the point where they explain the do-calculus, a methodology Pearl and his students developed to calculate, under a set of dependence/independence assumptions, what would happen if a specific variable is changed in a possibly complex network of interconnected variables. In fact, graphic representations of these networks, causal diagrams, are at the root of the methods presented and are extensively used in the book to illustrate many challenges, problems, and paradoxes.

In fact, the chapter on paradoxes is particularly entertaining, covering the Monty Hall, Berkson, and Simpson’s paradoxes, all of them quite puzzling. My favorite instance of Simpson’s paradox is the Berkeley admissions puzzle, the subject of a famous 1975 Science article. The paradox comes from the fact that, at the time, Berkeley admitted 44% of male candidates to graduate studies, but only 35% of female applicants. However, each particular department (departments decide the admissions in Berkeley, as in many other places) made decisions that were more favorable to women than men. As it turns out, this strange state of affairs has a perfectly reasonable explanation, but you will have to read the book to find out.

The book contains many fascinating stories and includes a surprising amount of personal accounts, making for a very entertaining and instructive reading.

Note: the ladder of causation figure is from the book itself.

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