You’re not the customer, you’re the product!

The attention that each one of us pays to an item and the time we spend on a site, article, or application is the most valuable commodity in the world, as witnessed by the fact that the companies that sell it, wholesale, are the largest in the world. Attracting and selling our attention is, indeed, the business of Google and Facebook but also, to a larger extent, of Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, Tencent, or Alibaba. We may believe we are the customers of these companies but, in fact, many of the services provided serve, only, to attract our attention and sell it to the highest bidder, in the form of publicity of personal information. In the words of Richard Serra and Carlota Fay Schoolman, later reused by a number of people including Tom Johnson, if you are not paying “You’re not the customer; you’re the product.

Attracting and selling attention is an old business, well described in Tim Wu’s book The Attention Merchants. First created by newspapers, then by radios and television, the market of attention came to maturity with the Internet. Although newspapers, radio programs, and television shows have all been designed to attract our attention and use it to sell publicity, none of them had the potential of the Internet, which can attract and retain our attention by tailoring the contents to each and everyone’s content.

The problem is that, with excessive customization, comes a significant and very prevalent problem. As sites, social networks, and content providers fight to attract our attention, they show us exactly the things we want to see, and not the things as they are. Each person lives, nowadays, in a reality that is different from anyone else’s reality. The creation of a separate and different reality, for each person, has a number of negative side effects, that include the creation of paranoia-inducing rabbit holes, the radicalization of opinions, the inability to establish democratic dialogue, and the diffiulty to distinguish reality from fabricated fiction.

Wu’s book addresses, in no light terms, this issue, but the Netflix documentary The Social Dilemma makes an even stronger point that customized content, as shown to us by social networks and other content providers is unraveling society and creating a host of new and serious problems. Social networks are even more worrying than other content providers because they create pressure in children and young adults to conform to a reality that is fabricated and presented to them in order to retain (and resell) their attention.

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