Is mind uploading nearer than you might think?

A recent article published in The Guardian, an otherwise mainstream newspaper, openly discusses the fact that mind uploading may become a real possibility in the near future. Mind uploading is based on the concept that the behavior of a brain can be emulated completely in a computer, ultimately leading to the possibility of transporting individual brains, and individual consciousnesses, into a program, which would emulate the behavior of the “uploaded” mind. Mind uploading represents, in practice, the surest and most guaranteed way to immortality, far faster than any other non-digital technologies can possibly aim to achieve in the foreseeable future.

This idea is not new, and the article makes an explicit reference to Hans Moravec book, The Mind Children, published by Harvard University Press in 1988. In fact, the topic has been already been addressed by a large number of authors, including Ray Kurzweil, in The Singularity is Near, Nick Bostrom, in Superintelligence, and even by me in The Digital Mind.

The article contains an interesting list of interesting sites and organizations, including CarbonCopies, a site dedicated to making whole brain emulation possible, founded by Randal A Koene, and a reference to the 2045 initiative, with similar goals, created by Dmitry Itskov.

The article, definitely worthwhile reading, goes into some detail in the idea of “substrate independent minds”, an idea clearly reminiscent of the concept of virtualization, so in vogue in today’s business world.

Picture source: The Guardian

Becoming immortal: pipe dream or reachable goal?

Woody Allen’s famous quote on immortality “I don’t want to achieve immortality through my work; I want to achieve immortality through not dying. I don’t want to live on in the hearts of my countrymen; I want to live on in my apartment.” has a different meaning for Dmitry Itskov. He aims to achieve immortality both through his work and through not dying.

Dmitry Itskov is a Russian entrepreneur and billionaire, best known for creating the 2045 initiative, which aims to achieve cybernetic immortality by the year 2045.

512px-Crystal_mind

 

Cited in a recent BBC article, Dmitry Itskov promises that “Within the next 30 years, I am going to make sure that we can all live forever.”

The idea sounds preposterous, but there is no doubt he is not deranged and is serious about it. It is indeed a breathtaking ambition, to achieve mind uploading by the year 2045, but could it actually be done?

The scientific director of the 2045 initiative, Randal Koene, a neuroscientist, who has done work on diverse aspects of brain modeling, believes the task is extremely difficult but not impossible, at least in theory. In a number of videos and presentations available in YouTube, he explains how existing technologies could be used, in principle, to reach this goal.

The question remains: will it ever become possible and, if so, when?

Image by Nevit Dilmen, via Wikimedia Commons